beemill
beemill:

stagbeetleloveit:

iggymogo:



via lstarlet

My bees wouldn’t stay out of my dog’s watering bowl and not only were they annoying her but they were drowning in large numbers.
At first I tried using a bird bath and changed the water twice a week for my bees, but never saw them using it. I think it was too close to the hive (they like their water source to be a bit farther away from the hive) and the birds were always in it.
So then I turned a medium sized pot into a water garden with plants and a piece of wood for them to land on. The bees are loving it! Every time I have gone to check on it there are 20+ of them drinking. Since I have set up the garden I have not found a bee in the dog bowl.
As for preventing mosquitoes, I plan on ordering a few tadpoles or feeder fish.
Edit for pictures. http://imgur.com/a/jDKVi




Actually, the best way to prevent mosquitoes and accidental bee drownings is to stuff even MORE stuff in there!
Shells, moss, stones, flowers.

Glass marbles

Or just stones! 
These make the best bee waterers, in my experience. It makes it really hard for mosquitoes to set up shop in the watering hole and next to impossible for your bees to drown in it. Plus, you can deck it out with all kinds of decorative things that will make it look cool as well as help the bees have safe access to water.

that’s a good idea! i’m thinking tho with the clear marbles or the clear jug there might be some green algae growth? wonder if that’s okay. but the moss and the stones and the shells in the first pic looks like a great idea.

beemill:

stagbeetleloveit:

iggymogo:

via lstarlet

My bees wouldn’t stay out of my dog’s watering bowl and not only were they annoying her but they were drowning in large numbers.

At first I tried using a bird bath and changed the water twice a week for my bees, but never saw them using it. I think it was too close to the hive (they like their water source to be a bit farther away from the hive) and the birds were always in it.

So then I turned a medium sized pot into a water garden with plants and a piece of wood for them to land on. The bees are loving it! Every time I have gone to check on it there are 20+ of them drinking. Since I have set up the garden I have not found a bee in the dog bowl.

As for preventing mosquitoes, I plan on ordering a few tadpoles or feeder fish.

Actually, the best way to prevent mosquitoes and accidental bee drownings is to stuff even MORE stuff in there!

Shells, moss, stones, flowers.

Glass marbles

Or just stones! 

These make the best bee waterers, in my experience. It makes it really hard for mosquitoes to set up shop in the watering hole and next to impossible for your bees to drown in it. Plus, you can deck it out with all kinds of decorative things that will make it look cool as well as help the bees have safe access to water.

that’s a good idea! i’m thinking tho with the clear marbles or the clear jug there might be some green algae growth? wonder if that’s okay. but the moss and the stones and the shells in the first pic looks like a great idea.

startwithaseed
jdbump:


A lack of water in the desert is making Egyptian farmers turn to ancient agricultural techniques to bring dead land to life.
Faris Farrag, a well-known Egyptian banker, is leading an Aquaponics project aimed at turning the Egyptian desert green. Farrag, who himself owns a farm in Cairo and is said to be fond of growing plants, told Al-Jazeera ‘As the price of water soars, as the price of petrol soars, and when the subsidies on farming disappear, this model makes sense.’
Aquaponics is an ancient irrigation technique which is believed to have been invented by the Aztecs which combines the commonly used aquaculture and hydroponic agricultural systems. Having studied the subject in the University of the Virgin Islands under Dr. James Rakocy, Farrag plans to introduce this technique to Egypt. The system has already been implemented in Yemen, Bangladesh and the UAE.
Dr. Ashraf Ghanem, who is a professor of water engineering at Cairo University, supported the project saying, ‘Could serve as a means of income generation for unemployed women, as well as a means of education for children of the household on principles of water saving, plant and fish biology, nutrient cycle, fluid mechanics, hydraulics, microbiology and renewable energies.’
At present Egypt is heavily dependent on the River Nile for its water, 85% of which goes to farming. However, Ethiopian plans to place a damn on the Blue Nile threatens to reroute the great river, which would be disastrous for Egypt.
SOURCE

This is a great article…but also make sure you look closely at this photo so you can see how the bottles drain the water from the top to the one below, all the way to the bottom where the runoff is collected in the bucket so as not to waste any water. The mouth of each inverted bottle is inserted into the open bottom of the bottle below. Holes are cut in the side of each bottle for the plant to grow out, while allowing the least amount of evaporation. Its recycled hydroponic gardening used to grow food in a minimal amount of space- all while reducing water loss and feeding hungry people! And how much would this whole thing cost to make? Almost nothing! Its pure genius…

jdbump:

A lack of water in the desert is making Egyptian farmers turn to ancient agricultural techniques to bring dead land to life.

Faris Farrag, a well-known Egyptian banker, is leading an Aquaponics project aimed at turning the Egyptian desert green. Farrag, who himself owns a farm in Cairo and is said to be fond of growing plants, told Al-Jazeera ‘As the price of water soars, as the price of petrol soars, and when the subsidies on farming disappear, this model makes sense.’

Aquaponics is an ancient irrigation technique which is believed to have been invented by the Aztecs which combines the commonly used aquaculture and hydroponic agricultural systems. Having studied the subject in the University of the Virgin Islands under Dr. James Rakocy, Farrag plans to introduce this technique to Egypt. The system has already been implemented in Yemen, Bangladesh and the UAE.

Dr. Ashraf Ghanem, who is a professor of water engineering at Cairo University, supported the project saying, ‘Could serve as a means of income generation for unemployed women, as well as a means of education for children of the household on principles of water saving, plant and fish biology, nutrient cycle, fluid mechanics, hydraulics, microbiology and renewable energies.’

At present Egypt is heavily dependent on the River Nile for its water, 85% of which goes to farming. However, Ethiopian plans to place a damn on the Blue Nile threatens to reroute the great river, which would be disastrous for Egypt.

SOURCE

This is a great article…but also make sure you look closely at this photo so you can see how the bottles drain the water from the top to the one below, all the way to the bottom where the runoff is collected in the bucket so as not to waste any water. The mouth of each inverted bottle is inserted into the open bottom of the bottle below. Holes are cut in the side of each bottle for the plant to grow out, while allowing the least amount of evaporation. Its recycled hydroponic gardening used to grow food in a minimal amount of space- all while reducing water loss and feeding hungry people! And how much would this whole thing cost to make? Almost nothing! Its pure genius…

hyggehaven

hyggehaven:

biodiverseed:

#garden science

Sowing the Paw Paw, or the “Indiana Banana” (Asimina triloba)

Paw Paws are the largest fruit native to the United States and Canada. They are difficult to propagate in orchard culture, and the fruits—while delicious and nutritious when eaten fresh—do not keep or transport well. As such they are uncommon in both commercial greenhouses, and unheard-of in supermarkets.

The seeds, like those of the Osage Orange and the American Persimmon, are thought to have been distributed by now-extinct megafauna, such as the giant sloth.

They require a period of cold-stratification: I had mine in resting in soil outdoors all winter.

I’m taking some advice from kihaku-gato in planting the seeds of the Paw Paw: I’ve taken off most of the seed coating (scarification), and sown them on a heated floor in a dark closet. Paw Paws are peculiar in that young seedlings dislike light, being that they are understory trees in the wild.

Hopefully this little experiment finally yields seedlings of this remarkable tree: I’ll be planting it far from the house, because the flowers smell like carrion in order to attract pollinators, and the leaves, branches and bark contain disagreeable-smelling insecticidal compounds called acetogenins

This is, however, an excellent plant for a temperate edible forest project. It establishes patches clonally through its rhizomes, and thrives in wet soil: for those of us with drainage problems, it it an excellent landscaping choice.

- biodiverseed // #garden science

My garden